Posted by: lindapemik | October 6, 2010

Who is lindapemik?

River of Life A Biography of lindapemik
One of our first assignments in eci831 is to share a biography with our classmates. We have been encouraged to make a short video and post to our blog or to YouTube. It is my choice not to do a video but to share my bio here on my blog in a much more textual way. Why no video? 1. TIME: it will take me too long to learn how–time that I would rather use in reading and analyzing the pedagogy of open learning. 2. ACCESSIBILITY: Many of my followers don’t have sufficient bandwidth to view on-line videos easily.

I  sprung up in small town Eastern Ontario 63 years ago, where from the age of 3, I developed a great fascination with aboriginal culture. I lived a controlled and main stream life that was not unlike growing up on the set of the TV show, “Happy Days”. I developed a life long love for music, drama and books and always did what was expected of me—was a good daughter, a star academic student, and graduated in 1969 from Queen’s University with a BA in Psychology and Economics and a BEd.

Then came the bend in the river.  I moved to Churchill Manitoba, where I was teaching at the last residential school for Inuit  run by the federal government, the Churchill Vocational Centre.Yearbooks from the Churchill Vocational Centre. see pg 16, Miss Lott. I detested the assimilation policies of the school but fell in love with my students. I so admired their calm and caring ways that I moved further northin 1970  to what is now Nunavut to learn from their parents and grandparents about what made them such special people. That began an enduring love affair with the land and several decades of my chosen assimilation into the Inuit culture.


In 1974, I married a strong and quiet man who is a great hunter and provider in the traditional sense, had four children and deliberately chose to adopt new cultural views and values as I relinquished my self to the Inuit way of life. We now have 8 grandchildren and I am firmly rooted in my adopted home land.

No surprise that relinquishment of Self led to a tumultuous eye opening (the waterfall) and a move in 1992 from our very traditonal town of Arviat to a more progressive and bi-cultural town, Rankin Inlet. A period of personal and professional development led to a rediscovery of Self and a new career as an adult educator. After completing a Masters degree in Adult Learning, on-line through the University of Calgary, in 2000, I soon moved into a senior administrative position as Director of Academics at Nunavut Arctic College.

All of my interests and passions are now leading in the same direction as they flow towards a new phase in life. I am facing a great big sea of possibilities that fills me with excitement. Joining this class is a new stream that I hope will help me incorporate the digital world into all aspects of my life and broaden my worldview so that I may become a connected global citizen not simply a Nunavummiut and a Canadian.

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Responses

  1. […] All of my interests and passions are now leading in the same direction as they flow towards a new phase in life. I am facing a great big sea of possibilities that fills me with excitement. Joining this class is a new stream that I hope will help me incorporate the digital world into all aspects of my life and broaden my worldview so that I may become a connected global citizen not simply a Nunavummiut and a Canadian. via lindapemik.wordpress.com […]

  2. I am fascinated by your story and do perfectly understand “forces” that encouraged you to take your journey.
    I came from Ukraine 11 years ago, and was amazed by Northern Canada and Northern People (I have taught in Shamattawa, MB not far from Churchill). 5 years later I have moved to Regina, Saskatchewan, but was “pulled” back up north year later. Plan to stay here; great nature, king and open people, good life… (slow internet, though)

    • Hi Stephan, slow internet for your too! Hurts doesn’t it. there is so much stuff out there that I want to read and research that I could do; its like being invited to a feast the day your started your “big for real this time diet”! and yes there is something about the North, both the land and the peoples that draws some of us like a magnet. How knowledgeable are you about e-learning in the North? Can you recommend any research or practical examples of how schools have adopted the use of web based learning?

  3. Daniel Pink, in his book, “A Whole New Mind,” talks about the importance of story in new creative pursuits. You have described an interesting, but more importantly, a personal journey (which is not unlike my own BTW, in a number of ways-Ontario born, Queens, aboriginal culture, Canada’s north) that engages the reader and takes them from roots in Eastern Ontario to the frontier of Canada’s North, with interesting stops on the way.
    Your life story parallels what is happening in education with technology. You embraced a new paradigm in the north, and made the shift successfully. It will not surprise me to find that you successfully embrace the 21st century learning, and teaching, that is moving forward at breakneck speed (slow Internet notwithstanding). Having made a significant paradigm shift once before, doing it all over again with educational technology and social networks will be just as rewarding!
    Keep writing!
    (I do suggest reading Pink’s book, as well as Howard Gartner’s “Five Minds for the Future.”)

    • thanks for the vote of confidence Rod. The Paradigm is shifting see my latest post! and I will take up the recommended reading.

  4. I love the way you have presented your story here, and certainly appreciate your position on accessibility. Thank you for sharing so much here!


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